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My Dog Ate A Frog And Is Vomiting

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The purpose of this article is to explain “My Dog Ate A Frog And Is Vomiting“.

I have a friend who tells a funny story about a dog he had called a Spaniel.

The spaniel’s favorite party trick was running up and down by the pond barking loudly whenever he spotted a frog.

Although the dog didn’t catch any frogs, it kept him fit nonetheless!

If their dogs manage to lick a frog or even eat one, what should they do?

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Is it necessary to contact a vet right away, or should it be a “watch and wait for” situation?

Discover more by reading on!

Help! My dog has eaten a frog

The chances are that nothing much will happen if you believe your dog swallowed a frog.

There is only one type of frog that is toxic to dogs in the US, but there is none in the UK. 

Your dog might vomit it back up because it is too slimy or your dog might get a touch of diarrhea after eating this new addition to their diet, but it is just as likely that they will continue to eat as usual.

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When your dog swallows a toad rather than a frog, however, the chances of something bad happening are much greater.

It is because all toads secrete toxins from their skin as a defense mechanism.

There are different levels of poison in this toxin, from leaving a bad taste in the mouth to killing a dog. 

In addition, there is no antidote for a frog or toad poisoning- there is no injection that your vet can give you when you take your dog in for an emergency appointment.

A bit of a home remedy is all that’s needed (and even your veterinarian will agree).

Your dog’s mouth has to be washed out as quickly as possible with water.

Water can be sprayed out of the front of the mouth using a garden hose.

You are doing this not only to rinse their mouths off as much toxin as possible but also to prevent any toxins from being swallowed by spraying from the back towards the front. 

Step-by-step, the vet explains it in this video. 

I’ll briefly cover some basic differences between frogs and toads now that I’ve explained what you should do if your dog swallows a frog

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Four differences between a toad and a frog?

Would you be 100% sure if your dog just ate a frog or a toad if he had just eaten a frog?

That’s because I’m not certain I would be.

What are the primary differences between a frog and a toad?

AmphibianSkinHabitatBack LegsSize & Shape
ToadWart-like. Lots of bumps. Visit water. Don’t live near it. Shorter. Used for crawling not hoppingChunky!
FrogSleek and smoothLive near water. Long legs, great for hopping. Small, slim, and sleek. 

Diagram showing the four main areas of difference between frogs and toads

As the table above illustrates, for dog owners like us there are four primary differences: skin, habitat, back legs, and size and shape. 

Skin

A frog’s skin is smooth, shiny, and wet most of the time, so it has a beautiful sheen to it. 

Toads have “uglier” skin with bumps like warts and a rough texture. 

The skin on their bodies appears dry. 

Habitat

Frogs live close to ponds and they spend more time in them because their skin doesn’t dry out.

Toads do not necessarily live near ponds or rivers. Their skin can tolerate being dry, so they don’t need as much water. 

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Back legs

In comparison to their size, frogs’ back legs are extremely long. Most of the time they hop on dry land.

In contrast, toads have very short back legs because they don’t hop, but crawl. 

Size and shape

Frogs have a very fit, sleek, and athletic appearance. Their bodies are slightly built- like long-distance runners.

Toads look like bouncers or door security at a nightclub, on the other hand. They don’t look like they can run fast. 

Once those differences have been discussed, we can move on to discussing which frogs or toads are poisonous or toxic to dogs. 

For this, I will examine frogs and toads found in the US and the UK separately. 

Three poisonous frogs and toads that live in the US

It is impossible to find an exact figure for the number of species of frogs and toads in the U.S.

However, I do know that there are about 300 species of amphibians living in the area. 

A list of interactive frog watches has been found.

By clicking on your state, you can find frogs that live nearby!

However, I do know that there is one poisonous species of frog, as well as two poisonous species of toad that can kill your dog.

I would like to introduce the first suspect…

1. Pickerel frog

Pickerel frogs are the only poisonous frogs in the US. 

Frogs of this species can grow up to 4 inches long (or 7.5 cm). 

A dark, almost square-shaped spot runs along the back of this animal.

In most of the eastern half of the US, they can be found in ponds or streams with relatively clear water.

The line would cross Wisconsin, Illinois, and Mississippi. There are populations of Pickering frogs in many states east of this boundary. 

Toxins secreted by their skin when threatened cause mild irritation. 

Fortunately, it is not life-threatening to dogs, but hopefully, it will send a message that they should be more careful next time.   

2. Cane toads 

It takes only fifteen minutes for a cane toad to kill a dog.

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Unpopular and ugly, they are not popular.

In Florida, residents are being instructed to kill any they come across. 

This toad is one of the largest in the world and can grow as large as nine inches!

Fortunately, they only live in a very small area around central and south Florida in the US. 

Originally introduced to curb pests in sugar cane fields, they are an invasive species. 

Nevertheless, when they were introduced in Australia in the 1930s, they were better at breeding than protecting sugar cane! 

They will eat anything they can, including small mammals and any pet food left out at night!

Poisoning by cane toads symptoms

3. Colorado River toads

As far as some dogs are concerned, this is another lethal killer.

The toad is also known as the Sonoran Desert toad and can grow up to 7.5 inches in length.

Besides its size, the olive skin of this bird is distinctive for its mottled appearance. 

The glands that secrete 5-MeO-DMT and bufotenin are located by its mouth, behind its ears and on its legs.

Both of these drugs are hallucinogenic tryptamines, which can kill a dog and also get a person high within 15 seconds, lasting for up to an hour.

The dog will probably be paralyzed for a few hours if it is not killed by the secretions. 

4. What are the symptoms of Colorado Toad poisoning?

When your dog licks, bites, or swallows a Colorado Toad, there will be various signs of distress such as foaming at the mouth, vomiting, or pawing at the mouth or eyes. 

Toads of this species live in Colorado, California, New Mexico, and Arizona. 

They can be found near streams, canals, and springs in desert and semi-arid regions. 

The poisonous frogs and toads that dogs may encounter in the US have been described. Now, let’s consider the poisonous frogs and toads that dogs might encounter in the UK. 

What poisonous frogs or toads live in the UK?

The UK has a much smaller number of frogs and toads than other countries.

The UK is home to two species of toad and to two species of frog, although one species of frog has very limited numbers. 

One type of toad is poisonous, but none of the frogs are poisonous.

Let’s begin with that one.

Common Toad

Toads are small in comparison with their cousins in the United States.

Females can grow to about 13 cm (5 inches) in length, while males can grow to 8 cm (3 inches). 

The rough skin of these animals is usually an olive-brown color.

Woodlands, scrub, and grasslands are their preferred habitats. 

The species can be found in most areas of the UK, except in Ireland. 

Toads like these are poisonous and when they feel threatened, they secrete a milky substance. 

Since their glands are larger, larger toads tend to be more poisonous because they have larger glands. 

Symptoms of Common Toad poisoning

There will be hypersalivation and some excess frothing in the mouth of a dog that has swallowed or licked a common toad, 

Natterjack Toad

The Natterjack is much less common than the Common Toad.

In addition, it isn’t toxic- it secretes a tasty toxic substance, but nowhere near as toxic as that of a Common Toad. 

It lives in coastal sand dunes, coastal grazing marshes, and on sandy heathlands.

Its main populations are along the Cumbrian and Norfolk coasts in England and along the Kerry coast in Ireland. 

Size-wise, mature adults can measure up to 7 cm, so they are smaller than most male Common Toads. 

An important feature of the natterjack is the yellow stripe on the back. They can be brown or green in color. 

Having discussed the UK’s two species of toads, I’d like to turn to their population of frogs. 

Common frog

It is the Common Frog that makes up the majority of frogs in the UK, although there are two species.

Your dog cannot be poisoned by the Common Frog. If it feels threatened, the frog does not secrete anything.

So they are just slimy protein snacks to a dog who chooses to eat them. 

Almost every part of the United Kingdom has them, which makes them common. 

In suburbs, they can be found in garden ponds, where they depend on them for survival. 

The adult can reach a length of 9 cm. 

Their backs are streaked with dark blotches of color in olive, green, and brown shades

Pool frog

Pool frogs were thought to be extinct in the UK until populations were reintroduced in Norfolk in the 1990s.

Frogs in pools are generally brown with dark splotches on their back. 

They have a yellow stripe on their back. 

Pool Frogs are non-toxic and do not secrete toxins like common frogs. 

Due to their limited number, your dog will be “lucky” if he can find one!

If you want to read more about dog health tips, read here: Dog Health Tips and Tricks.

My Dog Ate A Frog And Is Vomiting (Watch Video)

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